7-in-7 2018 SUBMISSIONS

Submission TitleSomething to Prove

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Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

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Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

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Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

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Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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Submission TitleSomething to Prove

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Lessons learned the hard way from a '68 RS.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

 

Something to Prove

I thought about trying to fix up my ’64 Impala but dad talk me into saving my money and getting something a little better to drive. So just before my sophomore year, I traded in my ’64 Impala for a ’68 RS Camaro. It cost me $900. It was white with a black vinyl top and was powered by a 327 fueled by a Quadrajet. It was all original and looking back I wish now I had left it that way!         Lesson One: If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

I worked hard as a kid. Unfortunately I spent the majority of my earnings on my car. Was it broke and in need of repair? No. It ran great. It was already fast but I wanted to go even faster. I had this warped idea that I had to prove myself. I needed to be the fastest, the best. So nearly every dime I could muster went into something else to improve the performance of the car. The speed shops had a saying, “Bolt it on and go fast!” After each paycheck I would hit the auto parts store for something I’d been eyeing all week.    Lesson Two: You don’t have to prove yourself to the world!

The order of purchases went something like this; custom air cleaner, mt valve covers, aluminum intake, holley carb, headers, turbo mufflers, duel exhaust, duel point ignition, 8mm wires, coil, M50x14 tires with slotted mags, 70’s for the front, traction bars, etc. At some point my junior year I rebuilt my engine; shaved the heads and block, cut out the exhaust valve seats to take 1.6” valves, TRW cam with a 453 lift with a 284 duration, electric fuel pump, on and on. Oh, and let’s get rid of the a/c while we’re at it; less drag on the engine! I also changed out the transmission for a turbo 400 with a shift kit, slight stall converter and the stock differential for a 12 bolt 4:10 posi-trac. Turned a completely original RS (priceless nowadays) into a hot rod. And I didn’t stop there. I redid the entire interior with a premium sound system, high back bucket seats and repainted the exterior a beautiful blue adding a spoiler.       Lesson Three: Don’t blow all your money on a car. In the end you’re gonna get married and have to sell it.

There’s not much I care to share about those years but here’s what I will. I received several tickets for speeding, contesting speed and exhibition of acceleration. In those days Austin had a system in place for kids like me. It was called “Teen Jury.” If I’m not mistaken, you could only use it once a year. You would stand trial and be sentenced by others your age. If the other kids liked you, you were sentenced to serve on two out of the next two teen juries. If they didn’t like you, you received community service. So did I ever become the fastest car around? Not even close. There’s always going to be somebody faster.                                                                Lesson Four: Grow Up! Don’t put your life and the lives of others at risk. If you want to race get on a race track.

 I’m not gonna lie, I loved that car. And if I could find it today I would buy it back and restore it to its original condition.            Lesson Five: Just as my ’68 Camaro was not meant to be a race car, we were not meant for sin. God has purchased us and is in the process of making us like Christ, the way we were meant to be.

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