7-in-7 2018 SUBMISSIONS

Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

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Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

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The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Leave a Comment for James!


Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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Submission TitleThe Tire Shop - Summer of '72

Short Description (for preview in feed)

Stories from the Summer of '72.

NameJames Reeves

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The Tire Shop – Summer of ‘72

The summer before 7th grade, my dad put me to work at his tire shop located on East 6h & Chicon St in Austin. He and a couple of other guys had joined forces and purchased a retread shop. I learned the proper way to dismount and mount tires, bubble balance tires, fix flats with a patch, fix flats with a plug and how to level a caliche parking lot with a pick and a shovel. There was little to no breeze in the place. The only cooling was from a couple of rattling old shop fans sitting on the floor. It was hot and sweat was the norm. An old AM radio placed up high on a tire rack played the latest tunes. The sound wasn’t that great so you never really knew what the lyrics were.

New tires were sold but the shop specialized in retreads which were made on the premises. Retreading is where you buff off the remaining tread of a used tire and add a new layer of rubber and place it in a heating mold to cure. The end result was a “like new” tire for a fraction of the cost of a new one. If the process was done correctly you had a dependable tire. Many of the local round and round race track drivers would buy tires from us. We also sold the larger tires for big trucks.

There were two dogs that guarded the place at night. King was a German shepherd and Fred, as he was called, was a black lab. How Fred ended up a guard dog I’ll never know. They were both fairly playful but Fred was my favorite to play with. Each night as we locked up we turned the dogs loose to patrol and prevent theft. In the morning they were always glad to see us. Most dogs’ exhibit unconditional love to their owners and this was true of these two as well. However, it wasn’t long until we noticed something funny about Fred. He was losing his playfulness. He had lost his joy. We weren’t sure what was going on. But dad thought he might know. So that night after my dad locked up, he peaked in through a window, gate or something and observed the two dogs.  It seems that King was true to his name. As soon as we would leave King would jump Fred, pinning him to the ground. King made a good guard dog but was NOT good at loving his neighbor. The solution was to take Fred home and leave King to guard the place alone.

If you’ve ever driven through downtown Manor, you’ve passed Duett’s Tire Shop. I first met the Duett family that summer before seventh grade while working at Dad’s tire shop. The Duett’s would show up in a big truck and buy up all the tires we had acquired that were still good used tires and not yet ready for a retread. They would also sell us tires that needed to be retreaded. You can’t find a nicer guy than Billy Duett. He was just a teenager then. Their business is selling new and used tires, fixing flats, doing state inspections and providing other auto related needs at a fair price. I know he’s honest and a he’s a Christian man.

Willie was an older man that was a specialist at buffing cores, putting on and curing the rubber. If a newly mounted retread needed little to no weight to balance the tire, Willie would proudly take the credit. “That must be one of mine!” I ended up buying my first car from Willie’s wife. It was a 64’ Impala. Cost me $200. I gave her $75 cash and paid out the rest.

Then there was big and bad Lewis. He was a huge man, I’m guessing in his mid-twenties that looked like he could have played football for most any college. He was a mass of muscle and as a young kid I thought he hung the moon. There was a pool hall next door, no wait; I think it was a beer joint with a pool table. Anyway, somehow we ended up watching him shoot pool over there. I honestly don’t know what the draw was unless the game was for money. I would hear Lewis talk about going up on the streets to play, meaning 11th & 12th Street. That was a dangerous place. Not realizing so I begged him to take me with him but he explained that even as big and bad as he was, he wouldn’t be able to keep them off me; them being a reference to the really bad dudes that hung out there.

Once in while there were two older gentlemen that would show up with dad’s partners; Bill was the original owner of the tire shop. The other owned a bunch of rent houses and was Bill’s running buddy. I didn’t always get to go but if I wasn’t too dirty they would take me with them to get a bite to eat at Cisco’s. Cisco’s Bakery was an Austin icon for decades. Their biscuits with gravy or jelly were oh so wonderful!

Finally the summer came to an end and I started seventh grade entering a new chapter in my life.

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