7-in-7 2018 SUBMISSIONS

Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

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A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

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He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Leave a Comment for James!


Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Leave a Comment for James!


Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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Leave a Comment for James!


Submission TitleHe was a laborer, as was I.

Short Description (for preview in feed)

A short story about a worker named Jose.

NameJames Reeves

Featured Image (for preview in feed)Featured Image (for preview in feed)
Full Description

He was a laborer, as was I.

Jose was raised on a small ranch in San Luis, Potosi, Mexico. It was a beautiful area surrounded by mountains. His family was ranch smart but lacked a proper education. As a young child of six, Jose was sent to Mexico City to live with his Aunt. He would be the first in his family to attend school. He told me that during that time he was extremely lonely. He was just a little boy and such a long way from home. Perhaps it helped him prepare for what was to come. After completing a modest amount of education he returned home and made plans with his brothers to head north. They were barely teenagers but they would join the millions who had preceded them to a land flowing with milk and honey. A land where there was work, all kinds of work, work that the Americans would rather not do. They would do anything to help their family survive so off they went. Once they found work they would send most of what they earned back to Mexico. These young men were brought up with a strong faith, a faith that would give them the strength and courage to press forward.

The brothers must have split up or traveled at different times. Each has their own unique story to tell. I can’t even imagine all of the obstacles they faced. I know they traveled at night to avoid the heat and getting caught.  It was a very dangerous journey. There were all kinds of wild animals and snakes to avoid. At times they went for days without food or water. One of Jose’s brothers went for two whole weeks without food. He thought he was going to die. He still tears up when the story’s retold. One day Jose pointed me to a dirty gritty old pond that cattle both drink out of and relieve themselves in and said, “That’s the kind of water we had to drink. We drank with the cows, grit and all.”

Jose and his brothers all made it to the North. While they found work they were treated like dirt. They were worked like mules with little to no regard for their well-being. Jose hired on at a wrecking yard. Cars were brought in and it was his job to disassemble them as soon as possible. It wasn’t long before he realized that the man he was working for was a crook. Many of the cars being brought in were stolen.

I’m thankful to say Jose escaped that life and entered the wonderful world of utility construction as a laborer. He started sometime in ’77, me in ’78. As the years passed he learn to speak English and rose in rank, from a laborer to an operator, to a foreman, to a supervisor and finally to an owner after which he became a US Citizen. I’ve only shared a snapshot of his life. But because of Jose’s rise in the construction world, he is considered by some to be a living legend. If you mention his name around anyone who does utility construction in the Central Texas Area, they will either know him or know of him.

I’ve known Jose for forty years. I have witnessed firsthand a new transformation in his life. There’s no doubt that Jose knows Jesus! These days he makes it a priority to get together daily with his pastor and others from his church to spend time in prayer. He is a good man. A good man that did what he had to do to provide for his family.

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